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June, 2016

Indian official resigns after outrage over her selfie with a rape survivor

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An Indian official resigned after facing public outrage for taking a selfie with a rape survivor in the western state of Rajasthan. The selfie, taken on June 29, went viral on social media, provoking widespread criticism for its insensitivity. 

The official Somya Gurjar is a member of the Rajasthan State Commission for Women, a body that advises the government on policies pertaining to women. The selfie was taken in a police station, where Gurjar along with her colleague Suman Sharma met the survivor. The 30-year-old had filed a complaint against her husband and his family members for gang-raping and tattooing expletives on her body for not meeting their dowry demands.  Read more…

More about Women, Rape, Selfie, India, and World

How Change.org became a legitimate force in Australian politics

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Until recently, politicians could safely ignore clicktivism.

Hundreds of online petitions could fill their inboxes and they could look the other way, but that’s changing. Now campaigns started on Change.org are translating into activism beyond the Internet and Australia’s elected officials are taking notice. 

In the 2016 election cycle, every major political party responded to at least one Change.org petition, if not more. It means you can start to make your voice heard by simply typing out your name.

For example, in recent months, leader of the Australian Greens, Richard Di Natale, responded to a petition calling for a sugar tax on soft drinks; Kelly O’Dwyer, the Liberal Party minister for small business, responded to one asking the government to stop the backpacker tax; and Penny Wong, leader of the Labor Party in the senate, also responded to a petition asking for funding to be returned to mental health programs.  Read more…

More about Politics, Change.Org, Australia, Tech, and Apps Software

Zoox raises $200 million at $1 billion valuation for its self-driving cars

Car tire on road, close up TechCrunch has confirmed reports that auto startup Zoox is raising about $200 million at a $1 billion valuation. We’ve also learned that investors Lux Capital and DFJ are involved in the round. The Palo Alto-based startup founded by Tim Kentley-Klay and Jesse Levinson, has been deliberately quiet about what they are working on presumably for competitive reasons, but the Zoox team has… Read More