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Homebound parents rejoice, Disney is releasing Frozen 2 on its streamer on Sunday

Late Friday night, Disney said that it would be making Frozen 2 available this Sunday, March 15.

The accelerated release date, a full three months ahead of its planned date, comes as all sorts of release schedules, premieres, and even entire new seasons of television shows are canceled or paused as Hollywood crafts its own response to the CoVID-19 outbreak.

“‘Frozen 2’ has captivated audiences around the world through its powerful themes of perseverance and the importance of family, messages that are incredibly relevant during this time, and we are pleased to be able to share this heartwarming story early with our Disney+ subscribers to enjoy at home on any device,” said Disney’s new CEO Bob Chapek in a statement.

Disney (along with Fox, which it owns) has pushed back the release of anticipated films like the live action version of “Mulan”, the Marvel superhero movie, “The New Mutants”, and the Guillermo del Toro-produced horror film, “Antlers”.

Pushing up the release date on “Frozen 2” makes sense, given that Disney is now basically a television, streaming and gaming company — much like every other studio struggling to adapt to the need for social distancing is prompting movie theaters to either close or dramatically reduce their capacity. At the same time, there have been reports that Disney has had issues producing original shows and movies for its streaming service.

The company previously pushed up the streaming release date of “Avengers: Endgame” to coincide with the launch of Disney+.

Internationally, the company is making “Frozen 2” available on Disney+ in Canada, the Netherlands, Australia and New Zealand on Tuesday, March 17.

U.S. audiences wanting to watch the movie on Sunday will only be able to stream it in high def. Ultra HD video playback isn’t going to be available until Tuesday.

Blackbox welfare fraud detection system breaches human rights, Dutch court rules

An algorithmic risk scoring system deployed by the Dutch state to try to predict the likelihood that social security claimants will commit benefits or tax fraud breaches human rights law, a court in the Netherlands has ruled.

The Dutch government’s System Risk Indication (SyRI) legislation uses a non-disclosed algorithmic risk model to profile citizens and has been exclusively targeted at neighborhoods with mostly low-income and minority residents. Human rights campaigners have dubbed it a ‘welfare surveillance state’.

A number of civil society organizations in the Netherlands and two citizens instigated the legal action against SyRI — seeking to block its use. The court has today ordered an immediate halt to the use of the system.

The ruling is being hailed as a landmark judgement by human rights campaigners, with the court basing its reasoning on European human rights law — specifically the right to a private life that’s set out by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) — rather than a dedicated provision in the EU’s data protection framework (GDPR) which relates to automated processing.

GDPR’s Article 22 includes the right for individuals not to be subject to solely automated individual decision-making where they can produce significant legal effects. But there can be some fuzziness around whether this applies if there’s a human somewhere in the loop, such as to review a decision on objection.

In this instance the court has sidestepped such questions by finding SyRI directly interferes with rights set out in the ECHR.

Specifically, the court found that the SyRI legislation fails a balancing test in Article 8 of the ECHR which requires that any social interest to be weighed against the violation of individuals’ private life — with a fair and reasonable balance being required.

In its current form the automated risk assessment system failed this test, in the court’s view.

Legal experts suggest the decision sets some clear limits on how the public sector in the UK can make use of AI tools — with the court objecting in particular to the lack of transparency about how the algorithmic risk scoring system functioned.

In a press release about the judgement (translated to English using Google Translate) the court writes that the use of SyRI is “insufficiently clear and controllable”. While, per Human Rights Watch, the Dutch government refused during the hearing to disclose “meaningful information” about how SyRI uses personal data to draw inferences about possible fraud.

The court clearly took a dim view of the state trying to circumvent scrutiny of human rights risk by pointing to an algorithmic ‘blackbox’ and shrugging.

The UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston — who intervened in the case by providing the court with a human rights analysis — welcomed the judgement, describing it as “a clear victory for all those who are justifiably concerned about the serious threats digital welfare systems pose for human rights”.

“This decision sets a strong legal precedent for other courts to follow. This is one of the first times a court anywhere has stopped the use of digital technologies and abundant digital information by welfare authorities on human rights grounds,” he added in a press statement.

Back in 2018 Alston warned that the UK government’s rush to apply digital technologies and data tools to socially re-engineer the delivery of public services at scale risked having an immense impact on the human rights of the most vulnerable.

So the decision by the Dutch court could have some near-term implications for UK policy in this area.

The judgement does not shut the door on the use by states of automated profiling systems entirely — but does make it clear that in Europe human rights law must be central to the design and implementation of rights risking tools.

It also comes at a key time when EU policymakers are working on a framework to regulate artificial intelligence — with the Commission pledging to devise rules that ensure AI technologies are applied ethically and in a human-centric way.

It remains to be seen whether the Commission will push for pan-EU limits on specific public sector uses of AI — such as for social security assessments. A recent leaked draft of a white paper on AI regulation suggests it’s leaning towards risk-assessments and a patchwork of risk-based rules. 

Max Q: SpaceX starts building out its production Starlink constellation

There’s literally a lot more stuff in space than there was last week – or at least, the number of active human-made satellites in Earth’s orbit has gone up quite a bit, thanks to the launch of SpaceX’s first 60 production Starlink satellites. This week also saw movement in other key areas of commercial space, and some continued activity in early-stage space startup ecosystem encouragement.

Some of the ‘New Space’ companies are flexing the advantages that are helping them shake up an industry typically reserved for just a few deep-pocketed defence contractors, and NASA is getting ready for planetary space exploration in more ways than one.

1. SpaceX launches 60 Starlink satellites

The 60 Starlink satellites that SpaceX launched this week are the first that aren’t specifically designated as tester vehicles, even though it launched a batch of 60 earlier this year, too. These ones will form the cornerstone of between 300-400 or so that will provide the first commercial service to customers in the U.S. and Canada next year, if everything goes to SpaceX’s plan for its new global broadband service.

Aside from being the building blocks for the company’s first direct-to-consumer product, this launch was also an opportunity for SpaceX to show just how far its come with reusability. It flew the company’s first recovered rocket fairing, for instance, and also used a Falcon 9 booster for the fourth time – and landed it, so that it can potentially use it on yet another mission in the future.

2. Rocket Lab’s new room-sized robot can don in 12-hours what used to take ‘hundreds’

Rocket Lab is aiming to providing increasingly high-frequency launch capabilities, and the company has a new robot to help it achieve very quick turnaround on rocket production: Rosie. Rosie the Robot can produce a launch vehicle about once every 12 hours – handling the key task of processing the company’s Electron carbon composite stages in a way that cuts what used to take hundreds of manual work hours into something that can be done twice a day.

3. SpaceX completes Crew Dragon static fire test

This is big because the last time SpaceX fired up the Crew Dragon’s crucial SuperDraco thrust system, it exploded and took the capsule with it. Now, the crew spacecraft can move on to the next step of demonstrating an in-flight abort (the emergency ‘cancel’ procedure that will let astronauts on board get out with their lives in the case of a post-launch, mid-flight emergency) and then it’s on to crewed tests.

4. Virgin Galactic’s first paying customers are doing their astronaut training

It’s not like they’ll have to get out and fix something in zero gravity or anything, but the rich few who have paid Virgin Galactic $250,000 per seat for a trip to space will still need to train before they go up. They’ve now begun doing just that, as Virgin looks to the first half of next year for its first commercial space tourism flights.

5. TechStars launches another space tech accelerator

They have a couple now, and this new one is done in partnership with the U.S. Air Force, along with allied government agencies in The Netherlands and Norway. This one doesn’t require that participants relocated to a central hub for the duration of the program, which should mean more global appeal.

6. NASA funds new Stingray-inspired biomimetic spacecraft

Bespin’s cloud cars were cool, but a more realistic way to navigate the upper atmosphere of a gaseous planet might actually be with robotic stingrays that really flap their ‘fins.’ Yes, actually.

7. Blue Origin’s lunar lander partner Draper talks blending old and new space companies

Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos announced a multi-partner team that will work on the company’s lunar lander, and its orbital delivery mechanism. A key ingredient there is longtime space industry experts Draper, which was born out of MIT and which is perhaps most famous for having developed the Apollo 11 guidance system. Draper will be developing the avionics and guidance systems for Blue Origin’s lunar lander, too, and Mike Butcher caught up with Draper CEO Ken Gabriel to discuss. (Extra Crunch subscription required)