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A copy of the Jonas Brothers’ ‘Burning Up’ ironically survived a house fire

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The powers that be have a sick sense of humor. 

When the Gregory family went back to their house to survey the wreckage after it burned down, they found salvaged an ironic relic: a copy of the Jonas Brothers’ tour book titled “Burning Up.” 

Yikes. 

“It was a very emotional process, but as we walked up to what used to be our porch, we saw this,” Twitter user @gayyspice said. “Sometimes God knows you need a good laugh.” 

Today, we went to my house to see if anything was salvageable. It was a very emotional process, but as we walked up to what used to my porch, we saw this. Sometimes God knows you need a good laughpic.twitter.com/GQj2rvt1AY

— Rexy ❄️ (@gayyspice) December 12, 2018 Read more…

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Of course Netflix’s new ‘watch that scene again’ feature pops up during ‘Shrek’

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OK, let’s talk Shrek. 

Right after Shrek and Donkey experience the highly interactive “Duloc Song” upon their arrival in Lord Farquaad’s kingdom, Donkey says, “Let’s do that again!” And now, if you agree with Donkey, you can do that again with just a click.

Per TIME, Netflix is testing a feature that prompts users to “watch that scene” (or song) again after what it’s deemed memorable sequences. People are already starting to notice it pop up in films like Dumplin’ and Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle. It’s unclear how Netflix chooses which scenes are eligible for the feature, but TIME theorizes that it does so based on individual data. Read more…

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Jack Dorsey and Twitter ignored opportunity to meet with civic group on Myanmar issues

Responding to criticism from his recent trip to Myanmar, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said he’s keen to learn about the country’s racial tension and human rights atrocities, but it has emerged that both he and Twitter’s public policy team ignored an opportunity to connect with a key civic group in the country.

A loose group of six companies in Myanmar has engaged with Facebook in a bid to help improve the situation around usage of its services in the country — often with frustrating results — and key members of that alliance, including Omidyar-backed accelerator firm Phandeeyar, contacted Dorsey via Twitter DM and emailed the company’s public policy contacts when they learned that the CEO was visiting Myanmar.

The plan was to arrange a forum to discuss the social media concerns in Myanmar to help Dorsey gain an understanding of life on the ground in one of the world’s fastest-growing internet markets.

“The Myanmar tech community was all excited, and wondering where he was going,” Jes Kaliebe Petersen, the Phandeeyar CEO, told TechCrunch in an interview. “We wondered: ‘Can we get him in a room, maybe at a public event, and talk about technology in Myanmar or social media, whatever he is happy with?’”

The DMs went unread. In a response to the email, a Twitter staff member told the group that Dorsey was visiting the country strictly on personal time with no plans for business. The Myanmar-based group responded with an offer to set up a remote, phone-based briefing for Twitter’s public policy team with the ultimate goal of getting information to Dorsey and key executives, but that email went unanswered.

When we contacted Twitter, a spokesperson initially pointed us to a tweet from Dorsey in which he said: “I had no conversations with the government or NGOs during my trip.”

However, within two hours of our inquiry, a member of Twitter’s team responded to the group’s email in an effort to restart the conversation and set up a phone meeting in January.

“We’ve been in discussions with the group prior to your outreach,” a Twitter spokesperson told TechCrunch in a subsequent email exchange.

That statement is incorrect.

Still, on the bright side, it appears that the group may get an opportunity to brief Twitter on its concerns on social media usage in the country after all.

The micro-blogging service isn’t as well-used in Myanmar as Facebook, which has some 20 million monthly users and is practically the de facto internet, but there have been concerns in Myanmar. For one thing, there was been the development of a somewhat sinister bot army in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, while it remains a key platform for influencers and thought-leaders.

“[Dorsey is] the head of a social media company and, given the massive issues here in Myanmar, I think it’s irresponsible of him to not address that,” Petersen told TechCrunch.

“Twitter isn’t as widely used as Facebook but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have concerns happening with it,” he added. “As we’d tell Facebook or any large tech company with a prominent presence in Myanmar, it’s important to spend time on the ground like they’d do in any other market where they have a substantial presence.”

The UN has concluded that Facebook plays a “determining” role in accelerating ethnic violence in Myanmar. While Facebook has tried to address the issues, it hasn’t committed to opening an office in the country and it released a key report on the situation on the eve of the U.S. mid-term elections, a strategy that appeared designed to deflect attention from the findings. All of which suggests that it isn’t really serious about Myanmar.